2004 - Ch Haut Brion 1er Cru Pessac-Léognan
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Haut-Brion
Region
Pessac-Léognan
Grape
Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2015 - 2035
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now

2004 CH HAUT BRION 1ER CRU PESSAC-LÉOGNAN - 12x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Haut-Brion
Region
Pessac-Léognan
Grape
Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2015 - 2035
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £4,112.14 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, May 2005,
    Score: -

    In the seventeenth century Samuel Pepys used to repair to the Pontac Arms to drink 'Ho-Bryan', a wine that has always been popular with the British. The 2004 is excellent. 61% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Sauvignon, 19% Cabernet Franc, this has great opulence and presence. However, true to the vintage the sweet, ripe fruit of the Merlot is tempered by the firm structure of the Cabernets. Jean-Philippe Delmas is of the opinion that this is the best Haut Brion since 2000. Drink 2013-2030

  • NM

    Neal Martin, February,
    Score: 93

    It has been a few years since I last tasted the 2004 Haut-Brion. Now at 12 years of age, it retains its deep color. The bouquet is "pleasant" if not as complex as the 2004 Latour, yet it's possibly just biding its time as it gradually opens with black fruit, black olive, even a touch of mint that might dupe you into thinking Pauillac. The palate is medium-bodied and very harmonious, almost caressing thanks to the Merlot lending that velvety texture. The second half changes tack, the Cabernet nudging the Merlot off the stage and delivering a more structured, possibly foursquare finish that is linear and correct. It is an excellent wine for the vintage although it will always be overshadowed by the 2005 inter alia. Maybe more personality just needs to develop? Tasted September 2016.

  • RP1

    Robert Parker, June 2007,
    Score: 92

    The dark plum/ruby-hued 2004 Haut-Brion exhibits a noble, discrete, smoky bouquet revealing notions of plum liqueur, black currants, sweet cherries, and subtle earth. In addition to its aromatic complexity, this medium-bodied effort reveals classic elegance and delicacy as well as sweet fruit in the mouth and a long finish. Give this streamlined, civilized wine 2-4 years of bottle age and drink it over the following 20-25 years. It is amazingly similar to Haut-Brion's 1999. Drink2009-2034

  • RP

    Robert Parker, June 2006,
    Score: 93-95

    An atypically high percentage of Merlot (61%) in addition to 19% Cabernet Franc, and 20% Cabernet Sauvignon make up the 2004 Haut-Brion. Fifty-five percent of the production was utilized for the grand vin, a surprisingly forward, charming, silky effort despite the relatively high tannin. In fact, it reminded me of the 1985 even though those vintage conditions have nothing in common with 2004 other than high yields. In any event, the 2004 is a beautiful effort that is far superior to the 2002. Soft, gentle, and gracious, with a deep plum/ruby/purple color, it offers up aromas of smoked herbs, sweet plums and black cherries, and hints of mulberries as well as earth. Medium-bodied, structured, pure, round, and seductive, with a long finish, there is more here than meets the eye and the palate. Drink 2009-2024 Although atypically delicate and light for this estate, the 2004 Haut-Brion exhibits the essence of this fabulous terroir situated in the suburbs of Pessac. Gravelly, smoky, cranberry, black cherry, and plum-like scents jump from the glass of this fresh, medium-bodied red along with notions of road tar, earth, and truffles. Stylish, with crisp acidity, it is a beautifully made, pure, long 2004 to enjoy during its first two decades of life. Drink 2006-2026

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, April 2005,
    Score: 18

    Deep crimson and just slightly less blue than La Mission. More aromatic lift than La Mission but lots of rigour. Strict framework, tannins more evident than flesh. A low key wine, but then Haut-Brion is always low key. Dry rather than sweet – so unpushy as to be easy to overlook. Fine dry tannins on the finish. A bit denser than La Mission. Drink 2014-2030

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Producer

Château Haut-Brion

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan in Graves, the estate is the only classified growth located outside the Médoc. Château Haut Brion has the most Merlot and the most Cabernet Franc of any of the First Growths and the second wine is Bahans Haut Brion.

Region

Pessac-Léognan

Stretching from the rather unglamorous southern suburbs of Bordeaux, for 50 km along the left bank of the river Garonne, lies Graves. Named for its gravelly soil, a relic of Ice Age glaciers, this is the birthplace of claret, despatched from the Middle Ages onwards from the nearby quayside to England in vast quantities. It can feel as though Bordeaux is just about red wines, but some sensational white wines are produced in this area from a blend of sauvignon blanc, Semillon and, occasionally, muscadelle grapes, often fermented and aged in barrel. In particular, Domaine de Chevalier is renowned for its superbly complex whites, which continue to develop in bottle over decades. A premium appellation, Pessac-Leognan, was created in 1987 for the most prestigious terroirs within Graves. These are soils with exceptional drainage, made up of gravel terraces built up in layers over many millennia, and consequently thrive in mediocre vintages but are less likely to perform well in hotter years. These wines were appraised and graded in their own classification system in 1953 and updated in 1959, but, like the 1855 classification system, this should be regarded with caution and the wines must absolutely be assessed on their own current merits.