2023 Ch Haut-Brion Blanc Bordeaux - 6x75cl
  • Colour White
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Drinking 2027 - 2048
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur

2023 - Ch Haut-Brion Blanc Bordeaux - 6x75cl

  • Colour White
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Drinking 2027 - 2048
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur
Case price: £1,635.00 In Bond
This wine is currently sold out, however we may be able to source additional stock. Contact your account manager or wine@goedhuiswaddesdon.com to enquire.
Please note: These wines are lying abroad until shipping and can only be purchased In Bond. If you are an existing Private Reserves customer, the wine will be automatically transferred on arrival. Otherwise, you will be contacted on arrival in the UK to arrange delivery, In Bond storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse.
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Pricing

  • IN BOND prices exclude UK Duty and VAT. Wines can be purchased In Bond for storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse, or for export to non-EU countries. Duty and VAT must be paid before delivery can take place.

  • RETAIL prices include UK Duty and VAT. Wines for UK delivery can only be purchased this way.

Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.
  • Neal Martin, April 2024, Score: 95-97

    The 2023 Haut-Brion Blanc was picked from August 21 until September 5. This is very detailed on the nose with orchard fruit, dewy meadow and light Mirabelle scents—very poised and focused. The palate is very well balanced with an irresistible texture, lightly spiced with impressive depth on the finish. It's the umami sensation that really lifts this superb Haut-Brion Blanc. Drink 2028-2055.

  • Wine Advocate, April 2024, Score: 93-94

    A bit shy, the 2023 Haut-Brion Blanc exhibits aromas of lemon, lemon oil, crisp stone fruits and spring flowers, followed by a medium to full-bodied, dense and fleshy palate that's round and layered, with chalky underlying structure and a long, mineral finish. It's a blend of 58% Sauvignon Blanc and 42% Sémillon. Drink 2025-2055.

  • Antonio Galloni, April 2024, Score: 93-96

    The 2023 Haut-Brion Blanc is a quiet, restrained white. Pear, mint, white pepper and crushed rocks are all beautifully sketched, its mineral character emerging with time. The 2023 is not an obvious wine, initially quite aromatic but less expressive on the palate. The long, sustained finish takes things to another level. Complex and dynamic, the 2023 grows over time, hinting at an exceptionally brilliant future. Drink 2028-2043.

  • James Suckling, April 2024, Score: 97-98

    The Haut Brion Blanc is open and very pretty, with sliced lemon, pear and white-peach character, as well as a hint of lemon grass. It’s full and layered with structure and focus. Crunchy finish. Fine phenolics and vibrant fruit for the vintage. 58.1% sauvignon blanc and 41.9% semillon.

  • Goedhuis Waddesdon, April 2024, Score: 96-98

    An almost even split of Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon in the blend, this is an intensely floral and exuberant white, brim-full of honeysuckle, preserved lemon, and orange peel, as well as subtle notes of vanilla and toasted oak. The palate possesses plenty of fruit, to-ing and fro-ing between flavours of lemon and grapefruit. There is an almost honeyed silkiness here that is kept honest by a chalky grip and lift of salinity. This will no doubt be a joy to drink for many years.

Producer

Château Haut-Brion

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan ...Read more

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan in Graves, the estate is the only classified growth located outside the Médoc. Château Haut Brion has the most Merlot and the most Cabernet Franc of any of the First Growths and the second wine is Le Clarence de Haut-Brion, known as Ch Bahans Haut Brion prior to 2007.Read less

Region

Pessac-Léognan

Stretching from the rather unglamorous southern suburbs of Bordeaux, for 50 km along the left bank of the river Garonne, lies Graves. Named for its gravelly soil, a relic of Ice Age glaciers, this is the birthplace of claret, despatched from the Middle Ages onwards from the nearby quayside to England in vast quantities. It can feel as though Bordeaux is just about red wines, but some sensational white wines are produced in this area from a blend of sauvignon blanc, Semillon and, occasionally, muscadelle grapes, often fermented and aged in barrel. In particular, Domaine de Chevalier is renowned for its superbly complex whites, which continue to develop in bottle over decades. A premium appellation, Pessac-Leognan, was created in 1987 for the most prestigious terroirs within Graves. These are soils with exceptional drainage, made up of gravel terraces built up in layers over many millennia, and consequently thrive in mediocre vintages but are less likely to perform well in hotter years. These wines were appraised and graded in their own classification system in 1953 and updated in 1959, but, like the 1855 classification system, this should be regarded with caution and the wines must absolutely be assessed on their own current merits.