2023 Ch Haut Brion 1er Grand Cru Classé Pessac-Léognan - 1x600cl
  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Case size 1x600cl
  • Available En Primeur

2023 - Ch Haut Brion 1er Grand Cru Classé Pessac-Léognan - 1x600cl

  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Haut-Brion
  • Region Pessac-Léognan
  • Case size 1x600cl
  • Available En Primeur
Case price: £0.00 In Bond
This wine has not been released yet. Contact your account manager or wine@goedhuiswaddesdon.com to express your interest.
Please note: These wines are lying abroad until shipping and can only be purchased In Bond. If you are an existing Private Reserves customer, the wine will be automatically transferred on arrival. Otherwise, you will be contacted on arrival in the UK to arrange delivery, In Bond storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse.
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Pricing

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Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.
  • Neal Martin, April 2024, Score: 96-98

    The 2023 Haut-Brion was picked at the same time as the La Mission Haut-Brion, albeit the secateurs sheathed one day later, on October 6. The nose is less immediate than the La Mission and the fruit is a little darker: blackcurrant, juniper, hints of black olive and a light cedar scent. The palate is medium-bodied with fine grip and tension. This has superb energy, presenting a crescendo of flavors toward a complex and persistent finish that lingers in the mouth. There is real pedigree to this First Growth, and it will certainly give 30 to 40 years of drinking pleasure. Drink 2030-2065.

  • Wine Advocate, April 2024, Score: 95-97

    The 2023 Haut-Brion exhibits a more Cabernet-inflected personality than the richer 2022, offering up a deep but youthfully reserved bouquet of dark wild berries, licorice, smoke and pencil lead mingled with notions of cigar wrapper, nicely integrated new oak and spices. Full-bodied, deep and velvety, it’s layered and concentrated, with a deep core of fruit structured around abundant but velvety tannins, concluding with a long, controlled finish. Somewhat reminiscent of the estate's successful 2006, it's a blend of 52.3% Merlot, 38.6% Cabernet Sauvignon and 9.1% Cabernet Franc. Drink 2025-2055

  • Antonio Galloni, April 2024, Score: 95-97

    The 2023 Haut-Brion is superb. Silky, soft tannins enshroud a core of black fruit, gravel, chocolate, cloves and licorice, building into a potent, sumptuous, dazzling wine. Exotic and racy, with remarkable polish, this has a ton of potential. It’s an especially sensual, seamless Haut-Brion. All the 2023 needs is time—probably quite a bit of it, especially for readers who want a full-on Haut-Brion experience. Drink 2033-2083.

  • James Suckling, April 2024, Score: 98-99

    This is tight, yet so upright and proper, with a vertical line of fine tannin that runs true and deep. It’s medium- to full-bodied with an exquisite texture and a long, structured finish. 52.3% merlot, 38.6% cabernet sauvignon and 9.1% cabernet franc.

  • Goedhuis Waddesdon, April 2024, Score: 97-98

    The Haut Brion Rouge shows the exceptional location that this great First Growth has in the hierarchy of Bordeaux estates. The microclimate appears a little warmer and so there is always a ripeness of fruit and richness that shines through in the wines. 52% Cabernet Sauvignon with 39% Merlot give this wine a feeling of both lush plushness and driven density in equal parts. An abundance of summer pudding fruits, it is giving and has a very full mouthfeel, kept in line by its tannic spine. A very seductive style with great length.

  • Matthew Jukes, April 2024, Score: 20+

    This is an immensely potent medium-weight wine. Its dimensions seem to defy belief: I kept going back to the glass expecting a different outcome, but it was immovable and lithe at the same time! Every time I thought the aroma or flavour was starting to senesce, it came back with another masterful wave of stunning fruit and rigid stature. This is as commanding and focused as any Haut-Brion I have tasted, and it is dogged persistence makes it a staggeringly brilliant and wondrously refreshing wine. The fruit tone is undoubtedly dark and brooding, and there are textural differences, infinitesimal changes of hue and angles of attack that surprise and amaze. My mind flashed to old war epics with divisions of tanks pushed with extended snooker cues across a cartographical interpretation of an expansive battlescape. I was minded to take the half-step to a perfect score as I sat here at La Mission, tasting through the entire portfolio of Domaine Clarence Dillon wines. I have already typed a 19.5+, as is sometimes the case with a wine that seems perfect, but I require time to inspect every single molecule willing perfection and God-given symmetry. But this wine does not possess these traits. It is restless, active, and ultimately imperfect in its mood, tension, and unreliability. It forces you to try to keep up. It does not conform to a box-fresh Haut-Brion model. And for me, that makes it all the more awesome. It wants me to work, it needs undivided attention, and it never stays still long enough for a complete and uniform analysis. I love that this wine might always be slightly out of reach because, regardless of its wraithlike abilities, I will be hot on its heels.

Producer

Château Haut-Brion

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan ...Read more

Arguably the oldest recognised Bordeaux grand cru, Haut Brion has been owned by the American Dillon family since 1935. The Château was an early moderniser - the first estate to implement steel vats in 1961 - and over the years, their incredible investments have re-established the inherent quality of this property, enabling it to emerge as possibly the most consistent first growth since the 1980s. Situated in Pessac-Léognan in Graves, the estate is the only classified growth located outside the Médoc. Château Haut Brion has the most Merlot and the most Cabernet Franc of any of the First Growths and the second wine is Le Clarence de Haut-Brion, known as Ch Bahans Haut Brion prior to 2007.Read less

Region

Pessac-Léognan

Stretching from the rather unglamorous southern suburbs of Bordeaux, for 50 km along the left bank of the river Garonne, lies Graves. Named for its gravelly soil, a relic of Ice Age glaciers, this is the birthplace of claret, despatched from the Middle Ages onwards from the nearby quayside to England in vast quantities. It can feel as though Bordeaux is just about red wines, but some sensational white wines are produced in this area from a blend of sauvignon blanc, Semillon and, occasionally, muscadelle grapes, often fermented and aged in barrel. In particular, Domaine de Chevalier is renowned for its superbly complex whites, which continue to develop in bottle over decades. A premium appellation, Pessac-Leognan, was created in 1987 for the most prestigious terroirs within Graves. These are soils with exceptional drainage, made up of gravel terraces built up in layers over many millennia, and consequently thrive in mediocre vintages but are less likely to perform well in hotter years. These wines were appraised and graded in their own classification system in 1953 and updated in 1959, but, like the 1855 classification system, this should be regarded with caution and the wines must absolutely be assessed on their own current merits.