2022 Ch d'Armailhac 5ème Cru Pauillac - 6x75cl
  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château d'Armailhac
  • Region Pauillac
  • Drinking 2027 - 2042
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur

2022 - Ch d'Armailhac 5ème Cru Pauillac - 6x75cl

  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château d'Armailhac
  • Region Pauillac
  • Drinking 2027 - 2042
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available En Primeur
Case price: £242.00 In Bond
This wine is currently sold out, however we may be able to source additional stock. Contact your account manager or wine@goedhuiswaddesdon.com to enquire.
Please note: These wines are lying abroad until shipping and can only be purchased In Bond. If you are an existing Private Reserves customer, the wine will be automatically transferred on arrival. Otherwise, you will be contacted on arrival in the UK to arrange delivery, In Bond storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse.
Go To Checkout

Need help? Call +44 (0)20 7793 7900 or email wine@goedhuiswaddesdon.com.

Pricing

  • IN BOND prices exclude UK Duty and VAT. Wines can be purchased In Bond for storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse, or for export to non-EU countries. Duty and VAT must be paid before delivery can take place.

  • RETAIL prices include UK Duty and VAT. Wines for UK delivery can only be purchased this way.

Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.
  • Neal Martin, April 2023, Score: 93-95

    The 2022 Château d'Armailhac was picked from 8 to 27 September and matured in 50% new oak. This has a very pure and sensual bouquet with precocious black plum, cassis violet and espresso scents. The palate is medium-bodied with muscular tannins on the entry, though I find just a little more complexity compared to the Clerc Milon this year. There's a gentle and discrete crescendo toward its delineated and minerally finish. Excellent. This is more like the d'Armailhac that I was familiar with, say, ten years ago. It will surely be irresistible once it reaches its peak. You've been warned. Drink 2027-2055

  • Wine Advocate, April 2023, Score: 92-94

    Deep aromas of raspberries, cherries, crushed mint and spices preface the 2022 d'Armailhac, a medium to full-bodied, layered and concentrated wine that's deep, lively and seamless, framed by powdery tannins and concluding with a penetrating finish.

  • Decanter, April 2023, Score: 95

    Strongly scented and perfumed on the nose, dark fruits, lively and lithe, supple and smooth on the palate, richly concentrated in terms of fruit density but sleek and stylish on the palate with a burst of bright and fresh blackcurrants and black cherries. Has a tang to it, the acidity and liveliness fills the mid palate before the stony tannins come in towards the end and give this bite and focus. More tense and streamlined than Clerc Milon, but so poised and finessed. This has bite and tension, the Cabernet speaks with liquorice, tobacco and clove subtly giving the spice at the end, but also a fresh mintiness. You can taste the gravel and the clay, putting the terroir in the glass. Really quite profound with concentrated fruit, juiciness and mouthwatering acidity. Fresh and lifted on the finish, you want more of this, but it will take some time to be more charming given its serious nature right now. One to wait for and be glad you did. 3.83pH. 11.3% press wine - usually at 7-8% maximum. 2% Petit Verdot completes the blend. HVE3 certified. Tasted twice. 50% new barrels.

  • Goedhuis, May 2023, Score: 94-96

    This is one of the most accessible and fruit-forward d’Armailhacs of recent years, and despite having 14.5% alcohol and a pH in the higher bracket for the vintage, it has all the components of a great wine. An inviting nose reminiscent of its First Growth stablemate, ripe blackberry and blackcurrant spill from the glass, alongside crème de mûre, loam and walnut. In the mouth it is equally elegant: starting softly with a generosity of fruit that’s true to the nose with more damson and blackcurrant juice. Lithe acidity keeps it refreshed, whilst the tannins build towards the finish. Grippy and firm, they’re chiselled, but in check.

  • James Suckling, April 2023, Score: 96-97

    This is like a baby Mouton this year with blackcurrant, flower, and orange aromas. Medium- to full-bodied with a tight and racy palate that shows persistence and verve. One to watch.

  • Jane Anson, April 2023, Score: 94

    The difference from a typical vintage colour is more marked in Armailhac than Clerc Milon, where we are more used to deep colours. This in contrast is an extremely intense Armailhac, really stepping into its Pauillac boots, a ton of deep plum, cassis and damson. Great expansion through the palate, beautiful depth of flavour, this is extremely impressive, with an edge of eucalyptus and graphite on the finish, and more grip than usual. Yields down to 26hl/h (there are more new plantings here so young vines). Second vintage with the new winery, and new technical director Lucille Lauilhé. Harvest September 8 to 27, 50% new oak, 3.83ph.

  • Jeb Dunnuck, April 2023, Score: 94-96

    Another wine that showed beautifully on multiple occasions, the 2022 Château D'Armailhac checks in as 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 16% Cabernet Franc, and the rest Petit Verdot. This deep purple-hued beauty offers up a full-bodied, ripe, sexy profile that carries lots of blueberry, cherry, and cassis fruit, notes of spice, leafy herbs, and chocolate, velvety tannins, good acidity, and a great finish. It should have a broad, lengthy drink window.

  • LPB, April 2023, Score: 93-95

    The 2022 d'Armailhac is a blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 22% Merlot, 16% Cabernet Franc, and 2% Petit Verdot. Deep garnet-purple in color, it slowly emerges from the glass with evocative blueberry pie, black raspberries, and warm cassis scents, giving way to hints of pencil lead, lilacs, and underbrush. The full-bodied palate delivers taut, muscular black fruit with beautifully rounded tannins and plenty of freshness, finishing long and spicy. This year represents a real step up. pH 3.83, TPI 75.

  • Matthew Jukes, April 2023, Score: 18+

    Château d’Armailhac (5ème Cru Pauillac) 60 Cabernet Sauvignon, 22 Merlot, 16 Cabernet Franc, 2 Petit Verdot 50% new oak 14.5% alc 3.83 pH 75 IPT 13.6% press wines used 26 hl/ha The older plantings of Cabernet Franc, situated on the plateau de Mouton, play a large part in this wine’s success; in fact, it is this wine’s signature in 2022. One usually tastes d’Armailhac before Clerc Milon in the Rothschild line-up, but this year, it is ‘closer’ to Mouton in style with its leviathan-like Cabernets gliding around beneath the surface of this wine. This is a more robust and structured d’Armailhac than I have seen before, and it will be slow to evolve and live a long life. The Cabernet Franc tops and tails the experience with haunting violet notes on the nose and crisp acidity seamlessly intertwined with the grippy, savoury tannins on the finish. Upright, stern yet beautifully polished and glistening in the glass, this is a sensational d’Armailhac and one that perfectly balances deep, dark fruit with invigorating bitterness.

Producer

Château d'Armailhac

For years this château had an identity crisis having almost as many names as France has had republics. It was created in the 18th century by Dominique d'Armailhac from a section of land situated between Mouton Rothschild and Pontet Canet and hence named Mouton d'Armailhac. In 1933, it was acquired by the Mouton branch of the Rothschild family and in 1956, its name was changed to Mouton-Baron-Philippe after Philippe de Roths...Read more

For years this château had an identity crisis having almost as many names as France has had republics. It was created in the 18th century by Dominique d'Armailhac from a section of land situated between Mouton Rothschild and Pontet Canet and hence named Mouton d'Armailhac. In 1933, it was acquired by the Mouton branch of the Rothschild family and in 1956, its name was changed to Mouton-Baron-Philippe after Philippe de Rothschild. Almost 20 years later, the Baron Philippe'swife died, and he changed the name to Mouton-Baronne-Philippe in her memory. If that was not enough, in 1989 the name reverted back to d'Armailhac in order to curb confusion with their brand, Mouton Cadet. Despite its chameleon-like name changes, for the past 20 years its quality has been consistent...Read less

Region

Pauillac

Due south of St Estèphe lies the appellation of Pauillac, the king of Left Bank communes. It is home to three first growths as well as a plethora of other classified growths. Pauillac's renowned well-draining, gravelly soils enable its dominant grape Cabernet Sauvignon to reach fantastic heights of complexity and concentration. As a result, Pauilac's wines tend to be full-bodied with compact tannins and good freshness. Its aromatics are often what one associates with classic Bordeaux: pencil shavings, black currant and occasional mint. Some of the most famous châteaux of the commune are Latour, Mouton Rothschild, Lafite Rothschild, Pichon Baron, Pichon Lalande and Lynch Bages.