2015 Ch Tertre Rôteboeuf Grand Cru St Emilion - 6x75cl
06B5TERO6PK _ 2015 - Ch Tertre Rôteboeuf Grand Cru St Emilion - 6x75cl
  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château le Tertre Rôteboeuf
  • Region St Emilion
  • Grape Merlot / Cabernet Franc
  • Drinking 2021 - 2042
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available Now

2015 - Ch Tertre Rôteboeuf Grand Cru St Emilion - 6x75cl

  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château le Tertre Rôteboeuf
  • Region St Emilion
  • Grape Merlot / Cabernet Franc
  • Drinking 2021 - 2042
  • Case size 6x75cl
  • Available Now
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Pricing Info
Case price: £1,066.07 Duty Paid inc VAT
Case price: £875.00 In Bond
Please note: This wine is available for immediate delivery.
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Pricing

  • IN BOND prices exclude UK Duty and VAT. Wines can be purchased In Bond for storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse, or for export to non-EU countries. Duty and VAT must be paid before delivery can take place.

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Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.
  • Goedhuis, April 2016, Score: 97-99

    This wine is as unique and charismatic as its proprietor, François Mitjavile – a true vigneron of the right bank. The nose is intensely scented with pomegranates, sweet cranberries, and cinnamon spice. It evokes a grand cru red Burgundy rather than traditional claret. The palate is arresting in its sinuous, graceful flow. The tannins are so finely knit, like the softest cashmere, melting into a sweetly fruited core that lingers for minutes after the tasting. Quite astonishing.

  • Neal Martin, July 2019, Score: 95+

    The 2015 Tertre-Rôteboeuf has a sumptuous, decadent and multi-layered bouquet with billowing black cherries, blueberry, crème de cassis and violet aromas that are hedonistic and irresistible. The palate is full-bodied with a lot of extraction: chocolate-tinged black fruit, sweet and candied with veins of peppermint toward the no-holds barred finish. A powerhouse of a Saint-Émilion, I was initially prudent with my score but the manner in which it coalesces in the glass is convincing. Tasted blind at the Southwold 2015 Bordeaux tasting.

  • Neal Martin, April 2016, Score: 97-99

    The 2015 Le Tertre Roteboeuf was picked between 8 and 12 October, François Mitjavile alternating his pickers between here and Roc de Cambes. Like his other 2015s, there is a nascent Burgundy-like allure on the nose that is beguiling in purity and beautifully defined, with scents of small dark cherries, Indian ink and a touch of cassis, an undertow of minerals that will surely become more perceptible as the wine ages in bottle. The palate is harmonious and animated. You are immediately taken by the fineness of the tannin and its velvety smooth texture. It just glides effortlessly along, extremely persistent and tensile on the finish. This will be irresistible once in bottle, and yet there is the substance to see it age for many years. Yes - it's just a little bit magical.

  • Antonio Galloni, April 2016, Score: 94-97

    One of the wines of the vintage, the 2015 Tertre Rôteboeuf is simply magnificent. Unctuous and deep, with fabulous aromatic intensity, the 2015 blossoms in all directions. The choice to harvest late comes through in a wine that is both incredibly concentrated but surprisingly light on its feet. Finesse, class and pedigree. It's all right there in the glass. The 2015 Tertre Rôteboeuf is virtually impossible to spit. Let's leave it at that.

  • Decanter, April 2016, Score: 93

    True to style: plush and approachable with an enticing aromatic complexity. Super ripe fruit but fresh and floral at the same time. Palate rich and suave but harmonious, the plentiful tannins smooth and long.

  • Matthew Jukes, April 2016, Score: 19+

    (80 Merlot, 20 Cabernet Franc) | 100% new oak. This is the fourth wine from the estate which I tasted (see L’Aurage, Domaine de Cambes and Roc de Cambes q.v.) and they all share fruit density and glossiness which must be the envy of the entire region’s wine wizards. That this is achieved with such sensuality and poise is completely beyond me. This wine is divisible into a million different elements and a large quantity of these err on the dark fruit side of the kaleidoscope (like many Saint-Emilions in 2015). But the range and incidence of other elements in this wine is what makes it such a compelling proposition. To name but a fraction of these sensations is foolish, but I am up for it, so here we go. Each of these is starkly obvious for a moment and then it’s gone into the swirling vortex and every time I go back to the glass I find more. Soft liquorice, hoisin, black Kiwi parade boot polish, homemade cranberry sauce, cinnamon sticks, freshly-sawn wood, barely ripe tiny red plums, William Curley’s raspberry toscano chocolates and on and on. The vast majority of these flavours come and go so quickly I cannot stand a chance of pinning them down. Many other great wines from this part of the world have three or four standout flavours - this wine has thousands. With stupendously fit tannins and racy acidity allowing this wine to stand proud it is one of the most memorable wines of the vintage.

  • Jancis Robinson, April 2016, Score: 18

    More nerve on the nose than the other wines in this stable. Very rich and round but with a structure. Very sweet but the tannins are much suppler. Spice and roundness on the palate. Something slightly brûlée but still very fresh. What fun! Drink 2023-2038

  • Tim Atkin, May 2016, Score: 93

    The heat of the year is certainly apparent here - as is the alcohol on the finish - but this is a wine that has plenty of structure and aromatic complexity too. It’s somewhere between a red Burgundy and a McLaren Vale Grenache in style. A total one-off. Drink: 2020-28

Producer

Château le Tertre Rôteboeuf

The oddly named Tetre Roteboeuf (hill of the belching beef) - so called after the oxen used to till the soil - exploded onto the scene in in the 1980's with Francois Mitjavile, the unique winemaker at the helm. His determination and single-mindedness to produce wines comparable to those from the likes of Pétrus and Lafleur in intensity and extract, in his vineyard southeast of St.Emilion, have apparently paid off.The 5.7 he...Read more

The oddly named Tetre Roteboeuf (hill of the belching beef) - so called after the oxen used to till the soil - exploded onto the scene in in the 1980's with Francois Mitjavile, the unique winemaker at the helm. His determination and single-mindedness to produce wines comparable to those from the likes of Pétrus and Lafleur in intensity and extract, in his vineyard southeast of St.Emilion, have apparently paid off.The 5.7 hectares of vineyards are planted with 85% Merlot and 15% Cabernet Franc. Mitjavile's harvests his grapes late - the grapes must be perfectly ripe, resulting in raisin-like lusciousness (Tertre Roteboeuf's trademark) and he keeps his yields small. He uses 100% new oak for the 18-22months of ageing. Parker states in his Bordeaux guide: "Le tertre Roteboeuf is irrefutably one of Bordeaux's superstars."Read less

Region

St Emilion

South of Pomerol lies the medieval, perched village of St Emilion. Surrounding St Emilion are vines that produce round, rich and often hedonistic wines. Despite a myriad of soil types, two main ones dominate - the gravelly, limestone slopes that delve down to the valley from the plateau and the valley itself which is comprised of limestone, gravel, clay and sand. Despite St Emilion's popularity today, it was not until the 1980s to early 1990s that attention was brought to this region. Robert Parker, the famous wine critic, began reviewing their Merlot-dominated wines and giving them hefty scores. The rest is history as they say. Similar to the Médoc, there is a classification system in place which dates from 1955 and outlines several levels of quality. These include its regional appellation of St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé, which is further divided into "A" (Ausone and Cheval Blanc) and "B" (including Angélus, Canon, Figeac and a handful of others). To ensure better accuracy, the classification is redone every 10 years enabling certain châteaux to be upgraded or downgraded depending on on the quality of their more recent vintages.