2014 - Chambolle Musigny 1er Cru Les Amoureuses Robert Groffier
09B4CMAG6PK _ 2014 - Chambolle Musigny 1er Cru Les Amoureuses Robert Groffier - 6x75cl
Colour
Red
Producer
Domaine Robert Groffier Père et Fils
Region
Chambolle-Musigny
Grape
Pinot Noir
Drinking
2022 - 2038
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now

2014 CHAMBOLLE MUSIGNY 1ER CRU LES AMOUREUSES ROBERT GROFFIER - 6x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Domaine Robert Groffier Père et Fils
Region
Chambolle-Musigny
Grape
Pinot Noir
Drinking
2022 - 2038
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £1,936.07 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • NM

    Neal Martin, December 2015,
    Score: (93-95)/100

    The 2014 Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Amoureuses, from 80-year-old vines, includes 50% whole bunch fruit and is matured in 50% new oak. It is interesting to compare this with the Bonnes-Mares; this is perhaps more serious, a little more saturnine (which is unusual for this vineyard), with touches of cold flint tincturing the blackberry and blueberry aromas. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, but there is real solidity here, the acidity well judged with a gentle grip on the saline finish. It clearly needs several years in bottle but it will be worth the wait. Neal Martin Score (93-95)/ 100 Drink Date 2028-2038 Once upon a time I visited Domaine Robert Groffier on a regular basis. I would pull into their courtyard in the left ventricle of Morey-Saint-Denis, their dog "Reine" would go ape-shit and attempt to eat me, whereupon I would descend into the cellars with Serge Groffier and his young son Nicolas to taste wines. To be honest, despite the laudation by this very publication, for every stellar success such as their brilliant 1988 Bonnes-Mares, there were others that felt overdone; the oak varnished over-zealously, wines that spoke of technique not terroir. In the end I decided that we cannot like everything, my interest waned and we became estranged. This was a shame because they farmed a small but strong array of vineyards. In recent months I caught wind that Groffier had changed under the charge of Nicolas, who began working alongside his father in 2004 and took over the running of the domaine in 2007. The words "elegant" and "Groffier" were found cohabiting the same sentence and this was evidenced when they gallantly donated a couple of 2012s to the annual "Burgfest" tasting (see issue 221). Perhaps it was time to reacquaint myself and see what was going on? So it was that almost ten years after my last visit, I pulled in to the courtyard. The dog went ape-shit. That was one thing that has not changed (I was later assured that "Reine" is a placid canine when he does not sniff "stranger danger"). Nicolas came out to greet me, frankly looking little changed since I last visited in January 2007, maybe with a passing semblance to Sheldon from the "Big Bang Theory". Now 31-years-old, he had lost none of his inhibitions, a garrulous chap, unquestionably self-confident, flirting with hubris and not short of opinion. His unprompted diatribe against his own 2009s was a veritable eruption of loathing, as if disowning your own baby. Once I knew never to open a Groffier 2009 if he ever came to dinner, I asked him what he looks for in his wine. "I work with sincerity. I do the best I can for the Passetoutgrain as much as the Bonnes-Mares. The Pinot Noir is the vertical column of a wine," he remarked. "It is important to have wines that age well and they must travel well too since they are sold all over the world." I then asked about the 2014s that we were about to taste. "It was easy...but not easy," he replied. "But it was a nice surprise. The flowering went very well and we were one month ahead of normal. Then for three weeks in August it was cool and overcast. It was a growing season of extremes. I started picking on September 15, which was one week earlier than I anticipated, because I was concerned about the health of the grapes and the warm conditions. The grapes were in a great shape and they were cut at the right time. I wanted to pick quickly [something that the domaine has often done] and we completed the harvest of eight hectares in just three days. The harvest is like taking a photo. [Nice analogy]. Yields were good, averaging 45 hectoliters per hectare, slightly less for the Grand Crus at 38 hectoliters per hectare. We did not have to use a sorting table because the harvest was quick. I did a gentle extraction as there was good ripeness on the grapes." The wines were matured in 25% new oak up to 50% for the Amoureuses and Bonnes-Mares, 100% for the Clos-de-Bèze with partial whole bunch (see notes for details). So, the burning question is: was it worth imperiling my life with belligerent "Reine" to taste Groffier's 2014s? The answer is yes. You could argue that these are wines still with a slightly modern sheen. I felt that the fruit erred to towards the black side of the spectrum when occasionally I wanted to see more red, perhaps just a bit more Pinoté. However, it was clear from the very first Passetoutgrain that a lot of care and consideration is expended on these 2014s. There was abundant freshness and finesse, a judicious use of whole bunch fruit and the oak enhanced the wines rather than dominated them, perhaps with the exception of the Clos-de-Bèze. In fact, I preferred the stupendous Bonnes-Mares and Chambolle-Amoureuses that both exuded more tension and focus, seemed to "sing" a little more than the Clos-de-Bèze that was not quite as vivid. The Premier Crus are also worth a look, in particular the Chambolle-Sentiers, one of the more underestimated vineyards, that had a brightness and coiled-up sense of energy to it that was very appealing. Salinity, that keyword of the 2014 vintage was present and correct in these wines, and this made them more-ish, something that I occasionally felt lacking in previous vintages. I look forward to seeing Nicolas (and Reine) again. I'll bring doggy biscuits next time.

Producer

Domaine Robert Groffier Père et Fils

Region

Chambolle-Musigny

The wines of Chambolle Musigny are like no other. They can be superbly delicate, yet mindblowingly complex. Of all the northern Burgundy appellations, they are the most ethereal, and as a result the most feminine. Most of the Chambolle Musigny vineyard area is encompassed in its Village and Premier Cru appellations including the robust Beaux Bruns, the splendidly mineral Le Cras and the poised yet powerful Les Amoureuses. It produces only two Grand Crus - the round and rich Bonnes Mares which it shares with Morey St. Dénis, as well as what could be described as the Stradivarius of grand crus, Musigny.