2012 - Ch Figeac 1er Grand Cru Classé St Emilion
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Figeac
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Cabernet Franc / Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot
Drinking
2022 - 2040
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now

2012 CH FIGEAC 1ER GRAND CRU CLASSÉ ST EMILION - 6x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Figeac
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Cabernet Franc / Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot
Drinking
2022 - 2040
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £868.07 (Inc. VAT)
Go to Basket

Need help? Call +44 (0)20 7793 7900 or email wine@goedhuis.com.

Pricing

  • IN BOND prices exclude UK Duty and VAT. Wines can be purchased In Bond for storage in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse, or for export to non-EU countries. Duty and VAT must be paid before delivery can take place.

  • RETAIL prices include UK Duty and VAT. Wines for UK delivery can only be purchased this way.

Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.

Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, April 2013,
    Score: 91-93

    Now under the famous consultancy team of Michel Rolland this is a very giving wine, with its perfumed aromas of violets and red fruits. There is tremendous weight and depth of fruit, with a long and rewardingly sweet fruit finish.

  • NM1

    Neal Martin, August 2016,
    Score: 93

    Tasted blind at the Southwold Bordeaux tasting. The 2012 Figeac put in a marvelous showing under strict blind conditions and it has clearly blossomed in bottle. It has an immediately engaging bouquet with vivid blackberry and raspberry fruit, wonderful mineralité and fine delineation. This is very composed, with a touch of graphite that almost takes you towards Pauillac rather than Saint Emilion. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, well-judged acidity, harmonious and lively with commendable precision towards the finish. This is a sophisticated and well-crafted Figeac that appears to be on an upward trajectory. Tasted January 2016.

  • NM

    Neal Martin, April 2013,
    Score: 90-92

    Michel Rolland made the blend of the 2012: 40% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Franc and 40% Cabernet Sauvignon (the 2010 was one-third of each grape variety.) It has a dark purple colour. The nose is bashful at first, well defined with expressive Cabernet Sauvignon imparting subtle cedar and mint aromas. The palate is medium-bodied with an edge entry defined by slightly chalky tannins. There is a touch for Schezhuan pepper at the tip of the tongue and to be honest, it is missing a little weight on the mid-palate due to the growing season. It has a little more harmony on the finish than previous year, maintaining the fresh Figeac style, but with more composure. Bodes well for the future.

  • AG

    Antonio Galloni, January 2016,
    Score: 93

    The 2012 La Grave Figeac offers light earthy scents on the nose but never really takes off from the glass. The palate is medium-bodied with dried-blood-infused red fruit, and quite dry at the back of the mouth. The finish is gritty and rather dour. Tasted at the Vine Trail portfolio tasting in London.

  • RP

    Robert Parker, April 2013,
    Score: 86-88

    The dark ruby/garnet/plum-colored 2012 Figeac is somewhat angular (no doubt because the Cabernet Sauvignon was not as ripe as it could have been), but it possesses an attractive, cedary, underbrush, Christmas fruitcake, black cherry and black currant-scented nose. Elegant and medium-weight with good purity as well as a slightly narrow finish, it is a very good to excellent Figeac that should drink well for 12-15 years. Several months ago the big news in Bordeaux was that Madame Manoncourt, the incredibly charming, vibrant, 80-year-old owner of Figeac, decided a make-over was necessary for this estate to regain its proper place in the market as well as elevate its quality, which has been mixed since their last great vintages of 1964 and 1970. Michel Rolland was brought in as the consultant, although he only did the assemblage (blending) for the 2012. He will have full control over the 2013. Drink 2013 - 2028

  • JS

    James Suckling, April 2013,
    Score: 93-94

    A wine with a mineral, blueberry and light clay character. Full body, with round and velvety tannins and a long finish. Shows plenty of mineral, iron and spice character. Can’t make up my mind if I like 2011 and 2012. I tasted both this time.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, April 2013,
    Score: 16.5

    Deep dark cherry colour. Bright, cedary and blackcurrant aroma. Slightly herbaceous but not overly so. Very gentle tannins, velvety already. Super-suave and approachable, just fresh enough. (I tasted this blind but extended the drinking dates when I saw at the end of the tasting that it was Figeac!) (JH) Drink 2016-2028

  • WS

    Wine Spectator, April 2013,
    Score: 91-94

    A very direct, compact and muscular style, with a dark core of currant, steeped blueberry and plum notes, liberally coated with roasted vanilla and melted licorice accents. Rather rounded for the vintage and a step behind the ‘11, relying more on a caressing edge than vigorous drive. —J.M.

More Tasting Notes Hide More Tasting Notes

Producer

Château Figeac

Château Figeac has had a chequered history. In the 19th century, its owner went bankrupt and it wasbroken up into various parts - some attaching themselves to Beauregard and La Conseillante.Another part became La Tour Figeac, which was later divided again creating La Tour du Pin Figeac.Luckily, 40 hectares of this once vast estate were able to cling together forming the parameters of one of St Emilion's most recognisable châteaux. Figeac is known to be almost Médoc-like with itssavoury and pensive character.

Region

St Emilion

South of Pomerol lies the medieval, perched village of St Emilion. Surrounding St Emilion are vines that produce round, rich and often hedonistic wines. Despite a myriad of soil types, two main ones dominate - the gravelly, limestone slopes that delve down to the valley from the plateau and the valley itself which is comprised of limestone, gravel, clay and sand. Despite St Emilion's popularity today, it was not until the 1980s to early 1990s that attention was brought to this region. Robert Parker, the famous wine critic, began reviewing their Merlot-dominated wines and giving them hefty scores. The rest is history as they say. Similar to the Médoc, there is a classification system in place which dates from 1955 and outlines several levels of quality. These include its regional appellation of St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé, which is further divided into "A" (Ausone and Cheval Blanc) and "B" (including Angélus, Canon, Figeac and a handful of others). To ensure better accuracy, the classification is redone every 10 years enabling certain châteaux to be upgraded or downgraded depending on on the quality of their more recent vintages.