2010 - Dom Pérignon Vintage
Colour
Champagne_Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2020 - 2037
Case size
3x150cl
Available Now

2010 DOM PÉRIGNON VINTAGE - 3x150cl

Colour
Champagne Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2020 - 2037
Case size
3x150cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £1,208.58 (Inc. VAT)
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Pricing

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Additional Information

  • Duty Paid wines have been removed from Bond and cannot subsequently be returned to Bond.  VAT is payable on Duty Paid wines. These wines must remain Duty Paid but can be purchased as such for storage subject to VAT.

  • En Primeur wines can only be purchased In Bond. On arrival in the UK these wines can either be stored In Bond in Private Reserves or another bonded warehouse or delivered directly to you. When you decide to take delivery, Duty and VAT at the prevailing rate become payable.

Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, July 2020

    After the stunning 2008 this has broader shoulders and is drinking beautifully right now. The nose has lots of personality with inviting layers of flavours; ripe pears, stone fruits mixed with hints of tropical fruits. As it opens, it reveals hints of umami and toasty savoury minerals. The palate, like the nose, is beautifully generous, with notes of tropical fruits, some floral touches, ginger biscuits and spice. Very fresh with great acidity giving lift, vibrancy and persistence. A rich underyling savoury smoky note and a saline and mineral finish. At the moment Chardonnay seems to dominate and it is beautiful. The core is still typical of Dom Perignon, tightly wound, tense and dense. It has a properly mouth-watering finish and great length. Something to enjoy this summer.

  • AG

    Antonio Galloni, August 2020,
    Score: 93

    The 2010 Dom Pérignon is hard to get a read on today. I have tasted it four times over the last few months, and my feeling is that it is still not totally put together. Apricot, pastry, chamomile, mint and light tropical notes are all signatures of a hot vintage with a very fast final phase of ripening that trails only 2002 and 2003 in terms of sugars. Of course, the year had plenty of challenges. The first part of the year was marked by cold and very dry weather during the winter and spring. June saw heat and some stress in the vines. July and August were quite warm, with heavy rains on August 15 and 16 that caused a widespread outbreak of botrytis that accelerated rapidly in the days leading up to harvest. Chef de Caves Vincent Chaperon explained that Chardonnay was favored over Pinot because better aeration within the clusters helped fend off rot, while parcels that had been less stressed by the June heat also suffered less from the effects of botrytis. Perhaps because of the unevenness in the season, there is also something disjointed about the 2010. While sugars were high, so were acidities, just behind 2008 in the decade of the 2000s. It will be interesting to see where the 2010 goes over time. It is the first vintage made under the direction of Vincent Chaperon, who worked alongside outgoing Chef de Caves Richard Geoffroy for many years. Drink 2012-2035.

  • WA

    Wine Advocate, May 2021,
    Score: 92

    The 2010 Dom Pérignon is already expressive, wafting from the glass with aromas of crisp green apple, peach, iodine, freshly baked bread, orange oil and smoke. Medium to full-bodied, pillowy and charming, it's soft and round, with ripe acids, a moderately concentrated core of fruit and a pearly mousse, concluding with a saline finish. Open-knit and pretty, this is a giving Dom Pérignon that readers might think of as reminiscent of a less reductive version of the 2000 vintage. Drink 2020-2035.

  • JS

    James Suckling, December 2020,
    Score: 98

    A firm and vivid Champagne with a precise, focused palate. Full-bodied and dry. It’s very layered and bright with light pineapple, peach, praline, cooked-apple and stone aromas and flavors. It’s very subtle and focused at the end. Integrated with richness and high acidity. Good depth. Reminds me of the 1995. Very clean. Solid. Lovely to drink already, but will age nicely.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, July 2020,
    Score: 18.5

    Amazingly, obviously, Dom P on the nose – the powerful lemon-mousse nose came soaring out of the glass long before my nose got anywhere near it. Massive intensity of complex aroma hints that this might be a little blowsy on the palate but not a bit of it. It's really tense and tight and has a certain fumy smokiness to the very concentrated palate. But its most marked feature is the persistence of the finish. This, along with the concentration, makes me confident we will be seeing this in a P2 version, even though 15% of the potential Pinot Noir was left on the ground. Definitely not a weak vintage of Dom P. Drink 2020-2030.

  • EA

    Essi Avellan MW, July 2020,
    Score: 95-97

    Gorgeous, amply toasty and smoky nose. Still holding back. The fruit is impeccably crisp and appetising but still the palate carries the best surprises. There is such volume and generosity but look at the acidity rolling in complementing the exciting textural dynamics. It comes with a superbly saline and perfectly pristine finish, leaving the mouth satisfyingly refreshed, yet yearning for more. There is an appetising fluffiness to the mousse and the wine takes its 5g/l dosage effortlessly. This is undoubtedly is a Dom Pérignon that will keep on giving. 95 points with potential for 97.

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Producer

Moët Chandon

Moët Chandon has been producing the world's most loved champagne since the house was founded in 1743 by Claude Moët (pronounced mow-ETT). The house now owns some 1500 acres and produces over 2 million cases of champagne. It was the first champagne house to list on the stock market and also holds the royal warrant in Britain to supply the Queen. Their best-known label, Dom Pérignon, is so named after the legendary Benedictine monk who is said to be the "father of champagne".

Region

Champagne

Champagne, the world's greatest sparkling wine, needs little introduction - with imitations produced in virtually every country capable of growing grapes, including such unlikely candidates as India and China. The Champagne region, to the north of Paris, has the most northerly vineyards in France, with vines grown on slopes with a southerly exposure to maximise sunlight. The soil is chalky, providing an excellent balance of drainage and water retention. The key to the wine is in the cellar - the bubbles result from a second fermentation in the bottle and the rich toasty flavours in great Champagne come from extended bottle ageing on the yeasty lees. Until the eighteenth century, the wines produced in the Champagne area were light acidic white wines, with no hint of sparkle. However glass and closure technology developed at that time and it was not long before Dom Perignon, a Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Hautvilliers, started experimenting with blends and produced the first recognisable champagne. In a world accustomed to still wines, the advent of champagne was almost a flop. It was saved when it became fashionable at the French court as a result of Louis XV's mistress Madame de Pompadour commenting "Champagne is the only wine that lets a woman remain beautiful after she has drunk it." And the rest is history, with famous (or infamous) champagne lovers including Casanova, Dumas, Wagner, Winston Churchill, James Bond and Coco Chanel.