2010 - Ch Pétrus Pomerol
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Pétrus
Region
Pomerol
Grape
Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2021 - 2041
Case size
3x75cl
Available Now

2010 CH PÉTRUS POMEROL - 3x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Pétrus
Region
Pomerol
Grape
Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2021 - 2041
Case size
3x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £14,708.04 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • NM2

    Neal Martin, February 2013,
    Score: 98+

    The Petrus 2010 is initially reticent on the nose - a serious Pomerol from the off. The first noticeable thing is that this is not a powerful bouquet like the 2009, much more linear and delineated with real minerality (which actually reminds me of L’Eglise-Clinet.) The palate is medium-bodied with very fine tannins. There is real intensity here, a Petrus with a sense of purpose: blackberry, touches of graphite borrowed from Pauillac, a little spice. It offers a silky smooth texture but remains linear right to the finish with subtle notes of bilberry, blackberry and crushed stone. Masculine and a little aloof, especially compared with the 2009, but utterly compelling, this Petrus will need at least 8-10 years in bottle.

  • NM

    Neal Martin, April 2011,
    Score: 96-98

    Tasted at the chateau, leaving the sample to open over five minutes, the nose unfurls enticingly in the glass. The bouquet displays extraordinary concentration with dark berries, boysenberry, crushed stone and a touch of crushed violet. Sumptuous like the 2009 but with a touch more delineation. The palate is medium-bodied but incredibly powerful, a maelstrom of flavours: dark cherries, briary, candied orange peel, a hint of spice but what is ethereal is the precision and clarity on the finish is stunning and defines the 2010 in its youth. Very sensual, very complete, very Petrus.

  • RP1

    Robert Parker, February 2013,
    Score: 100

    The harvest at Petrus took place between September 27 and October 12, and the 2010 finished at 14.1% natural alcohol, which is slightly lower than the 2009's 14.5%. The 2010 reminds me somewhat of the pre-1975 vintages of Petrus, a monster-in-the-making, with loads of mulberry, coffee, licorice and black cherry notes with an overlay of enormous amounts of glycerin and depth. Stunningly rich, full-bodied and more tannic and classic than the 2009, this is an awesome Petrus, but probably needs to be forgotten for 8-10 years. It should last at least another 50 or more. Someone told me recently that Petrus had a second wine, so I asked Olivier Berrouet, their young, talented administrator, whether that was true, and he flatly denied it, so if any Asian wine buyers are running across second wines of Petrus in Hong Kong or on mainland China, be warned – they are not genuine. Proprietor Jean Moueix, who I believe is in his late twenties, has taken over for his father, Jean-Francois, who has largely retired, and the younger Moueix has really pushed quality even higher at this renowned estate. Anyone visiting Pomerol would have undoubtedly noticed the renovations at Petrus, as it was once one of the most modest and humble buildings in the appellation. Moreover, I suspect that multi-millionaire/billionaire collectors will have about 50 years to debate over which vintage of Petrus turns out better, the 2009 or 2010. In a perfect world, most people would love to have a few bottles of each, or at least the opportunity to taste them once in a while, as they have become more of a myth than something real, but these wines do, in fact, exist!Drink: 2021-2071

  • RP

    Robert Parker, May 2011,
    Score: 98-100

    One of the most concentrated and massive Petrus offerings I have ever tasted, yields in 2010 were 35 hectoliters per hectare and the grapes were harvested between September 27 and October 2. The wine achieved 14.5% natural alcohol versus the 14.4% that was attained in 2009. Petrus has reduced its use of new oak over the last decade, now averaging under 50%. The 2010's dense purple color is followed by classic aromas of mulberries, black cherries, black currants, licorice, mocha, caramel and truffles. Full-bodied, multi-dimensional and impressively pure with high but sweet, well-integrated tannins, this 2010 should drink well for 30+ years. Drink: 2011 - 2041

  • JS

    James Suckling, April 2011,
    Score: 100

    This is extraordinary. It is just like 1989 (100 points for me) but it is even more refined and defined. It's so deep and compelling. I put my nose in the glass and I knew it was perfection.Full, yet super refined. So so long. It just builds and builds with flavor, like a tiny light in the sky that becomes a falling star. It is phenomenal. The analytical figures for the wine are off the charts with 15 percent more tannin than 2009, a pH of 3.5, and 14.5% alcohol.

  • DC

    Decanter, April 2011,
    Score: 19

    A distinguished wine. Precise, honest without surfeit. A natural expression of the cru. Affirmed structure and length but tannins suave and refined. Lovely fruit expression. Harmonious. Compelling now but long ageing. More 'classical' than '09. Drink 2022-2060.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, April 2011,
    Score: 19

    100% Merlot. Very deep crimson indeed. Right out to the rim. Hugely intense and succulent. Really muscular and concentrated. Very firm indeed. Good richness to begin with. Lightly bitter on the end. Wonderful texture. Creamy, with real minerals and lushness on the nose. Great vivacity. Drink 2020-2040

  • WS

    Wine Spectator, April 2011,
    Score: 95-98

    Still tightly wound, offering lots of briar, linzer torte and spice cake flavors, with a dark licorice snap note lacing up the finish. There's lots of grip to this, which is a more structured version of Merlot than a wine like the sleek, fruit-driven Le Pin. But shows a mouthwatering, pebbly feel that should unwind slowly over a long stretch of time. Tasted non-blind. -J.M.

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Producer

Château Pétrus

Undoubtedly one of the most celebrated and sought after estates in Bordeaux, Château Pétrus needs little introduction. This legendary chateau is owned by the Libournais merchant JP Moueix. Pétrus' vineyards are on the eastern side of the Pomerol appellation towards St. Emilion and are planted principally with Merlot with a smattering of Cabernet Franc. The style is famously opulent and complex.

Region

Pomerol

The small sub-region of Pomerol is situated north-east of the industrious city of Libourne. Pomerol's soils are predominately iron-rich clay with a smattering of gravel that produce wines with extraordinary power and depth. As a result of this clay-dominance, it has the highest percentage of Merlot planted in all of Bordeaux. Certain châteaux are produced exclusively from this grape, but most incorporate smaller quantities of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc as well. Despite its hefty (if not exclusive) proportion of Merlot, many people think of wines from this region as separate entities. As one wine aficionado stated recently, "It's not Merlot. It's Pomerol." Despite the region's small size, Pomerol contains some of the world's most sought after (and expensive) wines including Pétrus, Le Pin, Lafleur, l'Evangile and Vieux Château Certan. Unlike other Bordelais subregions, there is no system of classification. The châteaux are traded on reputation alone.