2005 Ch Léoville Barton 2ème Cru St Julien - 12x75cl
  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Léoville Barton
  • Region St Julien
  • Grape Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot / Cabernet Franc
  • Drinking 2018 - 2040
  • Case size 12x75cl
  • Available

2005 - Ch Léoville Barton 2ème Cru St Julien - 12x75cl

  • Colour Red
  • Producer Château Léoville Barton
  • Region St Julien
  • Grape Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot / Cabernet Franc
  • Drinking 2018 - 2040
  • Case size 12x75cl
  • Available

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Additional Information

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  • Goedhuis, March 2018

    A stark contrast to the dancing Poyferré, this was inky, deep, smoky, graphite-scented and tannic. The tannins are well-structured, and although bold, not overpowering. Thus the wine has a muscular gait without toppling over. It should go on evolving for many years to come.

  • Goedhuis, April 2006, Score: 93-95

    One of the great names in classically styled Bordeaux, Léoville Barton has been owned by the same family throughout its entire existence. Unusual for the Médoc region, there is actually no château based on the property.As a result, the wines are vinified and aged at neighbouring Langoa Barton, which as it's namesuggests, is also owned by the Barton family. Its 2005 is a serious wine. Powerful and backwards with spice and meaty flavours, this is a wine built for long cellaring but will reward those patient enough. Superbly long finish. Drink 2016-2035+.

  • Antonio Galloni, April 2021, Score: 96

    The 2005 Léoville-Barton is clearly one of the wines of the vintage. Powerful and strapping in the glass, the 2005 is a big, big wine. Huge swaths of tannin wrap around a core of inky black fruit, new leather, spice, gravel, mocha and licorice. The wine's sheer density is impressive, but its balance is even more compelling. I might be temped to give this another few years in the cellar. Readers lucky enough to own it will find a thrilling, potent Saint-Julien that overdelivers big time. I loved it.

  • Robert Parker, June 2015, Score: 92

    Léoville Barton’s 2005 has an inky ruby/purple color and shows fairly high tannin levels, but the balance is slightly better that the Langoa Barton, which is very hard. This is probably a 30-year wine and needs at least another 20 years of cellaring, and while the tannins are high, they are balanced more thoroughly and competently. With deep cassis and red currant fruit, the wine is earthy, spicy, medium to full-bodied, and needs at least another decade. Drink it between 2025 and 2050.

  • Robert Parker, April 2008, Score: 95

    Another prodigious, but brutally tannic, offering from the affable Anthony Barton, the inky/blue/black-hued 2005 Leoville Barton exhibits a sensational perfume of charcoal, burning embers, underbrush, cedar, creme de cassis, and subtle toasty oak. Painfully concentrated (much like the 2000 was at the same stage), with full body, admirable purity, and several boatloads of muscular tannin, this St.-Julien is built for 50-60 years of cellaring. Its purity and precision are typical of today's winemaking, but Barton is certainly not making a wine for near-termgratification. This is another 2005 that will require enormous patience. Anticipated maturity: 2020-2065.

  • Robert Parker, April 2007, Score: 94-96

    What can you say about Anthony Barton? He has made yet another classic wine that will not be approachable for a decade, but will last 50 or more years. The inky/blue/purple-colored 2005 Leoville Barton offers up aromas of forest floor, cedar, spice box, black currants, and background oak as well as smoke. Boasting massive concentration, full body, and exceptional purity, but excruciatingly tannic and backward, this cuvee is meant for those with 19th century tastes, but also exhibits the purity and precision of modern winemaking. Patience is demanded with this beauty as it will take many years to approach any level of accessibility/maturity. Anticipated maturity: 2020-2060+.

  • Robert Parker, April 2006, Score: 94-96

    A monumental beast possessing dramatic levels of concentration, tannin, and potential, Leoville-Bartons opaque purple-hued 2005 reveals amazingly sweet notes of black currants, damp forest floor, and spice box. It is a deep, powerful, unctuously-textured effort with enough acidity to provide freshness as well as definition. Broader and more masculine than the 2000, and more classic than the 2003, the 2005 is a monster meant for long-term aging. Anticipated maturity: 2015-2055.

  • Jancis Robinson, April 2006, Score: 17+

    Lively crimson - looks very youthful. Light, mineral notes on the nose. Fine tannins at first, becoming dominant on the mid palate. Very tight and fine-tuned. Reined in. Far from opulent with lots of dryness on the finish. Dry, grainy tannins. Extremely solid and earthbound. Set for the very long term. Langoa is more expressive for the moment but may not last as long. Drink 2018-30.

  • Wine Spectator, April 2006, Score: 95-100

    Fantastic aromas of currants, black licorice and berries. Fresh flowers. Light smoke. Big and velvety with loads of fruit. Long. Gorgeous. Sexy. Love it. Seems like another 2003; wait and see.

  • Jancis Robinson, Feb 2017, Score: 17/20

    Tasted blind. Healthy deep crimson. Clean, intense nose. Lots of ripe if slightly simple blackcurrant fruit. Dusty end. No charmer! A mouthful of minerals. But there is life here too. Jancis Robinson Drink Dates 2020 -2040 Score 17/20

Producer

Château Léoville Barton

One of the great names in classically styled claret, Léoville Barton has been owned by the same family throughout its entire existence - an unheard of rarity in Bordeaux. Their roots can be traced back to 1826, when Hugh Barton bought 50 hectares of vines in the heart of St Julien and subsequently Château Leoville Barton was made a 2ème Cru Classe in the 1855 classification. Today, the Château is run by Anthony Barton’s dau...Read more

One of the great names in classically styled claret, Léoville Barton has been owned by the same family throughout its entire existence - an unheard of rarity in Bordeaux. Their roots can be traced back to 1826, when Hugh Barton bought 50 hectares of vines in the heart of St Julien and subsequently Château Leoville Barton was made a 2ème Cru Classe in the 1855 classification. Today, the Château is run by Anthony Barton’s daughter Lillian and her son Damien Barton-Sartorius. Unusual for the Médoc region, there is no château based on the property. As a result, the wines are vinified and aged at neighbouring Langoa Barton, which as its name suggests, is also owned by the Barton family.Read less

Region

St Julien

St Julien is like the middle child of the Médoc - not as assertive as Pauillac or as coquettish as Margaux. It lies firmly between the two more outspoken communes and as a result produces a blend of them both. St Julien's wines have often been sought out by aficionados for their balance and consistency, particularly in the UK. Yet due to its middle child nature, it can occasionally be overlooked globally and as a result underrated by those markets outside the UK. Despite the fact that it has no first growths, it has several second growths including Léoville Las Cases, Léoville Barton, Léoville Poyferré and Ducru Beaucaillou as well as the celebrated châteaux such as Talbot and Beychevelle.