2005 - Ch Bellevue Grand Cru Classé St Emilion
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Bellevue
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2015 - 2028
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now

2005 CH BELLEVUE GRAND CRU CLASSÉ ST EMILION - 12x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Bellevue
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Merlot / Cabernet Franc
Drinking
2015 - 2028
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £656.14 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, April 2006,
    Score: 90-93

    Produced from 80% Merlot and 20% Cabernet Franc, the 2005 has lots of everything - ripeness of fruit, tannins and minerality. Very expressive of the vintage, it also has a pretty, shy side which comes through, especially on the finish. Drink 2012-2020.

  • RP2

    Robert Parker, April 2008,
    Score: 94+

    Bellevue has only been making terrific wine since 2000, which probably explains why they were not upgraded to a grand cru classe in St.-Emilion's most recent reclassification. This small (15.5acres), south-facing hillside vineyard has such outstanding neighbors as Angelus and both Beausejours. Additionally, it boasted Nicolas Thienpont and Stephane Derenoncourt as managers, who represent uncompromising viticulture and winemaking at its best. The winemaking team is likely to change as the estate was recently sold to Angelus. The 2005, a blend of 80% Merlot and 20% Cabernet Franc, is a wine for true connoisseurs. It possesses a dense purple color to the rim along with a huge perfume of camphor, charcoal, graphite, blackberries, cassis, raspberries, and a liqueur of rocks-like component. Super-concentrated with chewy richness as well as enormous tannins, it, along with Ausone and Clos de Sarpe, may be St.-Emilion's most backward wine. More of a long distancerunner, it will provide little near-term pleasure. Anticipated maturity: 2017-2040.

  • RP1

    Robert Parker, April 2007,
    Score: 94-96

    The spectacular 2005 Bellevue should rival, possibly eclipse their 2000. This 15.5-acre, south/southwest facing vineyard, near both Beau Sejour Becot and Beausejour-Duffau as well as Angelus, has been on a qualitative roll since Nicolas Thienpont and Stephane Derenoncourt began to manage the estate in 2000. A blend of 80% Merlot and 20% Cabernet Franc, it possesses an extraordinary mineral component along with huge, sweet blackberry and cassis notes with hints of raspberries and crushed rocks. A super black/purple color only hints at the wine's richness,massive concentration, and monster tannins. It represents the essence of terroir. Some people were surprised that Bellevue was not promoted in the new St.-Emilion classification, but they have only been making high quality wines since 2000. Prior to that, there was a succession of mediocrities. The 2,000-case 2005 came in at a whopping 14.5% natural alcohol, but the alcohol is barely noticeable due to the wine's richness. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2028+.

  • RP

    Robert Parker, April 2006,
    Score: 94-96

    This estate has been on a qualitative hot streak since 2000, when it was taken over by the brilliant team of Nicolas Thienpont and Stephane Derenoncourt. Looking more like a vintage port than a traditional Bordeaux, the 2005 (less than 2,000 cases produced) was fashioned from yields of 38 hectoliters per hectare. A midnight black color is accompanied by an extraordinary perfume of crushed rocks, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, and flowers. Boasting a fabulous texture, superb richness, huge tannin, and massive concentration, this stunning 2005 will need 7-10 years to reach adolescence. It is a brilliant wine, but not for the shy of heart. Anticipated maturity: 2011-2026.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, April 2006,
    Score: 15

    Not much nose but good lively juicy fruit underneath. A bouncy wine that's a little stringy in terms of some pretty severe tannins. Correct but not a standout. Drink 2012-16.

  • WS

    Wine Spectator, April 2006,
    Score: 89-91

    Violet and blackberry with a hint of licorice. Full-bodied, with a solid core of fruit and silky tannins. Very pretty. Tannic. Should be at least as good as 2003.

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Producer

Château Bellevue

Château Bellevue was the property of the de Conink and Pradel de Lavaux families, also owners of the historic negociant house of Horeau-Beylot. In 2007, Chateau Angélus acquired a 50% share in the company. This purchase was motivated as much by the geographical situation of the chateau, next-door to Angélus, as well as chateaux Beaséjour Duffau-Lagarrosse and Beau-Séjour Bécot, as by the exceptional quality of its terroir. The vines of Château Bellevue are located around a hilltop of hard rock, on one of the slopes of Saint Emilion, with a maximum height of 75 meters. At their summit on the chalk plateau, they neighbour the Premier Grand Cru Classés Beausejour-Bécot and Beausejour Duffau-Lagarosse with another Premier Grand Cru Classé, Château Angelus, at their base. As its name indicates, Château Bellevue and its marvellous park, dominate the whole valley with its south/southwest facing vineyards sloping away from the property. At the top of the slope, the soil (of marine origin), rich in magnesium and iron, contains quite a high percentage of clay. These quality clays, with a delicately layered structure, become chalkier closer to the summit. Closer to the bottom, the level of chalk in the soil diminishes. Lower again, the soils are sandy with little chalk and therefore more acidic. This diversity of soils and their variety of terroirs all contribute to the complexity and the nobility of the wines produced by Château Bellevue.

Region

St Emilion

South of Pomerol lies the medieval, perched village of St Emilion. Surrounding St Emilion are vines that produce round, rich and often hedonistic wines. Despite a myriad of soil types, two main ones dominate - the gravelly, limestone slopes that delve down to the valley from the plateau and the valley itself which is comprised of limestone, gravel, clay and sand. Despite St Emilion's popularity today, it was not until the 1980s to early 1990s that attention was brought to this region. Robert Parker, the famous wine critic, began reviewing their Merlot-dominated wines and giving them hefty scores. The rest is history as they say. Similar to the Médoc, there is a classification system in place which dates from 1955 and outlines several levels of quality. These include its regional appellation of St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé, which is further divided into "A" (Ausone and Cheval Blanc) and "B" (including Angélus, Canon, Figeac and a handful of others). To ensure better accuracy, the classification is redone every 10 years enabling certain châteaux to be upgraded or downgraded depending on on the quality of their more recent vintages.