2003 - Dom Perignon P2
19A3DPP23PK _ 2003 - Dom Perignon P2 - 3x75cl
Colour
Champagne_Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2021 - 2030
Case size
3x75cl

2003 DOM PERIGNON P2 - 3x75cl

Colour
Champagne Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2021 - 2030
Case size
3x75cl

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Additional Information

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Tasting Notes

  • JS

    James Suckling, June 2021,
    Score: 98

    This is a very thick, dense Dom Pérignon with layers of ripe fruit. Dried apple, pineapple and pie crust with some nougat undertones. Dense and layered with chewy tannins and a juicy finish. Umami undertone. This has the highest percentage of Pinot Noir ever. 15 years on the lees in bottle. 62% Pinot Noir and 38% Chardonnay. Drink or hold.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, June 2021,
    Score: 18

    The notoriously daring vintage of Dom Pérignon at 18 years old in recently disgorged form. Rich, broad nose, with notes of candied mandarin - not instantly recognizable as Dom P on the nose. Toasty palate entry and still quite rich on the palate, thanks to lower than usual acidity presumably. Again, there was no fear of phenolics when making this wine as the logic was that the phenolics would make up for the softness of the acidity. This is now a gentle wine with very much its own personality. Soft and smoky at the start and then saline and refreshing on the finish. It's more like a bit of told-you-so evidence than necessarily, the one Dom P you would choose from the current range available. But, boy, does it persist! Drink 2021 – 2027.

  • EA

    Essi Avellan MW, June 2021,
    Score: 96-97

    Every Dom Pérignon vintage is built to eventually become a Plénitude 2 and Plénitude 3 and so is the 2003! It was such a challenging and unprecedentedly hot year. Yet there is nothing heavy in Dom Pérignon of the year. The nose is stunningly toasty with sweet, vanilla laden fruit, hay, juniper, cookie dough and cream. On the palate it is exuberant, round and textured with a notion of firming phenolics of a hot year on the back palate. The time on lees seems to have created some extra roundness and delicious sweetness to the fruit. Finely bubbling energetic palate finishing on a pure mineral freshness.

  • RJ

    Richard Juhlin, Champagne Club, June 2021,
    Score: 95-96

    A wonderful and unique wine from an equally unique vintage filled with oxidation-preventing phenols. I have always been a faithful defender of this wine. It will forever be unique and different with a higher density and concentration than any other Dom Pérignon. Every minute a new sequence of aromas that dominates appears. In some sips the gray toasted and classic notes dominate, next time iodine and oyster shell take over to let the richly candied fruit of peach, mango and apricot jam take over in a third wave. What makes me recognize the vintage are the notes of licorice, black truffle, ash, tar, salt and asphalt. The structure is monumental and muscular with a wonderful interplay between dynamics, rhythm and intensity. In the taste, the same dark notes emerge as in the aroma, but the fruit is in this P2 stage more floral and spicy with a hint of lemongrass and mint where the normally disgorged version breathes more nougat, mint chocolate and orange.

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Producer

Moët Chandon

Moët Chandon has been producing the world's most loved champagne since the house was founded in 1743 by Claude Moët (pronounced mow-ETT). The house now owns some 1500 acres and produces over 2 million cases of champagne. It was the first champagne house to list on the stock market and also holds the royal warrant in Britain to supply the Queen. Their best-known label, Dom Pérignon, is so named after the legendary Benedictine monk who is said to be the "father of champagne".

Region

Champagne

Champagne, the world's greatest sparkling wine, needs little introduction - with imitations produced in virtually every country capable of growing grapes, including such unlikely candidates as India and China. The Champagne region, to the north of Paris, has the most northerly vineyards in France, with vines grown on slopes with a southerly exposure to maximise sunlight. The soil is chalky, providing an excellent balance of drainage and water retention. The key to the wine is in the cellar - the bubbles result from a second fermentation in the bottle and the rich toasty flavours in great Champagne come from extended bottle ageing on the yeasty lees. Until the eighteenth century, the wines produced in the Champagne area were light acidic white wines, with no hint of sparkle. However glass and closure technology developed at that time and it was not long before Dom Perignon, a Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Hautvilliers, started experimenting with blends and produced the first recognisable champagne. In a world accustomed to still wines, the advent of champagne was almost a flop. It was saved when it became fashionable at the French court as a result of Louis XV's mistress Madame de Pompadour commenting "Champagne isthe only wine that lets a woman remain beautiful after she has drunk it." And the rest is history, with famous (or infamous) champagne lovers including Casanova, Dumas, Wagner, Winston Churchill, James Bond and Coco Chanel.