2003 - Dom Pérignon
Colour
Champagne_Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2012 - 2025
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now

2003 DOM PÉRIGNON - 6x75cl

Colour
Champagne Sparkling
Producer
Moët Chandon
Region
Champagne
Grape
Pinot Noir / Chardonnay
Drinking
2012 - 2025
Case size
6x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £1,340.58 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, January 2012

    This wonderful blend of 60% Pinot Noir and 40% Chardonnay exudes richness and volume of fruit, the warm fruit flavours have an almost Meursaultesque characteristic to them balancing a structured Chardonnay and yeasty nuttiness with a fine sensation of minerality. This is not a vintage styled with driven acidity and freshness but more one of great depth and texture and the beautifully refined mousse makes this a very complex prestige cuvée indeed. The secret to Dom Perignon's success is always its absolute drinkability and joyous pleasure and this stunning 2003 has all these characters in abundance.

  • RP

    Robert Parker, August 2011,
    Score: 94+

    The 2003 is one of the most unusual Dom Perignons I have ever tasted, going back to 1952. The 2003 Dom Perignon is a big, broad shouldered wine. In 2003 Geoffroy elected to use more Pinot Noir than is typically the case, and that comes through in the wine's breath and volume. The 2003 is a big, powerful Champagne that will require quite a bit of time to shed some of its baby fat. The trademark textural finesse is there, though. I expect the 2003 to be a highly divisive Champagne because of its extreme personality, but then again, many of the world's legendary wines were made from vintages considered freakish at the time. The 2003 is an atypically, rich, powerful, vinous Dom Perignon loaded with fruit, structure and personality. It is not for the timid, but rather it is a wine for those who can be patient. No one has acrystal ball, but personally I will not be surprised if in 20 years time the 2003 is considered an iconic Champagne.

  • JR

    Jancis Robinson, October 2011,
    Score: 18.5

    Disgorged Jun 2010, scheduled for release early 2012. I had tasted a bottle that had just been disgorged a couple of weeks earlier and this second example seemed to have a much more persistent finish. Very much part of the Dom P family with its reductive, smoky nose with tight lemony fruit and a hint of citrus peel. Beautifully balanced - perhaps not quite as intense as the marvellous 2002 but there is no hint of its being a heatwave wine and it still has lots of unfurling to do. Ramrod straight in structure. Bit of a peacock's tail on the finish. Thoroughly satisfying.

  • WS

    Wine Spectator

    Unfortunately there is only one new release from Dom Perignon this year. The 2003 is one of the most unusual Dom Perignons I have ever tasted, going back to 1952. Readers will remember that 2003 was a torrid vintage across northern Europe, especially during the critical month of August, when temperatures remained very hot for well over a month. The harvest was the earliest on record, until 2011, that is. I suppose its not that surprising Chef de Caves Richard Geoffroy chose to make a 2003 Dom Perignon, given his penchant for risk-taking, an approach that has yielded so many memorable wines that stretch the perception of what big brand Champagne is and can be. The 2003 Dom Perignon is a big, broad shouldered wine. It does not have the seductiveness of the 2000, nor the power of the 2002. It is instead very much its own wine. In 2003 Geoffroy elected to use more Pinot 'is a big, powerful Champagne that will require quite a bit of time to shed some of its baby fat. The trademark textural finesse is there, though. I expect the 2003 to be a highly divisive 'were made from vintages considered freakish at the time. The 2003 is an atypically, rich, powerful, vinous Dom Perignon loaded with fruit, structure and personality. It is not for the timid, but rather it is a wine for those who can be patient. No one has a crystal ball, but personally I will '

  • RJ

    Richard Juhlin, Champagne Club, June 2011,
    Score: 96

    It is perhaps surprising to many people that my first choice for this year is Dom Pérignon, 96 points. However it is actually quite natural if one considers that they have far and away the most extensive acreage to choose from and can control their style better than anyone else. Add to this the fact that Dom Pérignon's greatest problem nowadays is lack of concentration as a consequence of overproduction then you will understand that it is only a blessing when Nature concentrates the fruitiness as occurred in 2003, I am convinced that this powerful and extra-opulent wine is going to be at its best if drunk when it is really old. Thirty years old is probably a suitable age despite the low acid. The wine is massively reminiscent of the 76 and it will be a joy to see if more wines are going to age as beautifully as the 76's.

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Producer

Moët Chandon

Moët Chandon has been producing the world's most loved champagne since the house was founded in 1743 by Claude Moët (pronounced mow-ETT). The house now owns some 1500 acres and produces over 2 million cases of champagne. It was the first champagne house to list on the stock market and also holds the royal warrant in Britain to supply the Queen. Their best-known label, Dom Pérignon, is so named after the legendary Benedictine monk who is said to be the "father of champagne".

Region

Champagne

Champagne, the world's greatest sparkling wine, needs little introduction - with imitations produced in virtually every country capable of growing grapes, including such unlikely candidates as India and China. The Champagne region, to the north of Paris, has the most northerly vineyards in France, with vines grown on slopes with a southerly exposure to maximise sunlight. The soil is chalky, providing an excellent balance of drainage and water retention. The key to the wine is in the cellar - the bubbles result from a second fermentation in the bottle and the rich toasty flavours in great Champagne come from extended bottle ageing on the yeasty lees. Until the eighteenth century, the wines produced in the Champagne area were light acidic white wines, with no hint of sparkle. However glass and closure technology developed at that time and it was not long before Dom Perignon, a Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Hautvilliers, started experimenting with blends and produced the first recognisable champagne. In a world accustomed to still wines, the advent of champagne was almost a flop. It was saved when it became fashionable at the French court as a result of Louis XV's mistress Madame de Pompadour commenting "Champagne isthe only wine that lets a woman remain beautiful after she has drunk it." And the rest is history, with famous (or infamous) champagne lovers including Casanova, Dumas, Wagner, Winston Churchill, James Bond and Coco Chanel.