1989 - Ch Gruaud Larose 2ème Cru St Julien
0689GRUA _ 1989 - Ch Gruaud Larose 2ème Cru St Julien - 12x75cl
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Gruaud Larose
Region
St Julien
Grape
Cab. Sauvignon/ Merlot/ Cab. Franc/ PV / Malbec
Drinking
2010 - 2025
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now

1989 CH GRUAUD LAROSE 2ÈME CRU ST JULIEN - 12x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Gruaud Larose
Region
St Julien
Grape
Cab. Sauvignon/ Merlot/ Cab. Franc/ PV / Malbec
Drinking
2010 - 2025
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £1,352.14 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • GDH

    Goedhuis, July 2003

    Slightly under whelmed by the nose, which is herbaceous combined with lots of burnt oak flavours. However very good indeed on the palate. Lots of blackcurrant fruit, balanced by ripe tannins and acidity. Close to its peak now, but will age happily for many years. Tasted July 2003.

  • NM

    Neal Martin, July 2018,
    Score: 90

    The 1989 Gruaud Larose is a wine that I have tasted a dozen or so times since back in 2001, most recently in 2012. The bottle was poured against several Californian wines that might be unfair, however, I do feel that this vintage has maybe peaked several years ago. Here it was well defined on the nose as usual, with scents of undergrowth, sandalwood and a touch of sage. It certainly lacks the joie-de-vivre that I expect. The palate is medium-bodied with fine grain tannin, nicely judged acidity and quite compact black fruit, though this is a little more staid than before, certainly lacking the flamboyance of the 1990 Gruaud (for example). It is a thoroughly decent Gruaud that just fails to engage the same way as previous examples. Tasted over dinner at Chez Bruce.

  • RP

    Robert Parker, February 1997,
    Score: 89

    In this blind tasting, the 1989 Gruaud-Larose was corked, but a bottle secured through a friend and tasted under non-blind circumstances was excellent, nearly outstanding. The herbal side of Gruaud-Larose was more noticeable in the 1989. The wine revealed a deep ruby/purple color (but not the opaqueness of the 1990), more obvious tannin, without the mid-palate and sweet inner-core of fruit exhibited by the 1990. It is a big, tannic, spicy wine, with plenty of potential, but not the sweetness and chewy texture of the 1990. The 1989 needs more time to shed its cloak of tannin; give it 5-8 years of cellaring and drink it over the following 20+ years. Drink 2000-2022

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Producer

Château Gruaud Larose

Gruaud Larose is one of the most dispersed châteaux. The estate is almost like a hamlet unto itself, with stone building after stone building all decorating the property like life-sized Monopoly board pieces. Reviewing its family history, it is easy to understand why. For many years it had been shuffled from one owner to the next, subsequently divided, pieced back together only to be divided again. After all these divisions and transformations, the estate stands today at 150 hectares, 82 of which are planted with vines. Its current owners, the Merlaut family, purchased the château in 1997. Their other holdings include Chasse Spleen, La Gurgue, Haut Bages Libéral, Citran and Ferrière. Considerable financial investment has contributed to the château's new found dynamism. Not only is it one of the more self-sufficient châteaux in Bordeaux, it is also one of the most natural. Practicing organic techniques, they create their own compost from the remnant stalks, skins and seeds and were the first château to recycle their own water.

Region

St Julien

St Julien is like the middle child of the Médoc - not as assertive as Pauillac or as coquettish as Margaux. It lies firmly between the two more outspoken communes and as a result produces a blend of them both. St Julien's wines have often been sought out by aficionados for their balance and consistency, particularly in the UK. Yet due to its middle child nature, it can occasionally be overlooked globally and as a result underrated by those markets outside the UK. Despite the fact that it has no first growths, it has several second growths including Léoville Las Cases, Léoville Barton, Léoville Poyferré and Ducru Beaucaillou as well as the celebrated châteaux such as Talbot and Beychevelle.