1995 - Ch Figeac 1er Grand Cru Classé St Emilion
Colour
Red
Producer
Château Figeac
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Cabernet Franc / Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot
Drinking
2001 - 2012
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now

1995 CH FIGEAC 1ER GRAND CRU CLASSÉ ST EMILION - 12x75cl

Colour
Red
Producer
Château Figeac
Region
St Emilion
Grape
Cabernet Franc / Cabernet Sauvignon / Merlot
Drinking
2001 - 2012
Case size
12x75cl
Available Now
Duty Paid (Inc. VAT)
Case price £2,072.14 (Inc. VAT)
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Tasting Notes

  • NM

    Neal Martin, August 2016,
    Score: 92

    Tasted at the Château Figeac vertical at the property from one of the last remaining imperials, one could argue that the six-liter format would have benefit the 1995 Figeac. Even so, that should not take anything away from this, the best vintage of that decade. Firstly, one notices that it is deeper in color than the underwhelming 1996. Then you fall into the aromatics, a beguiling concoction of blackcurrant pastilles, melted tar and tobacco all beautifully preserved after two decades. What differentiates it from the succeeding vintages is that here there is the fruit to back it up. The palate is fresh and quite dense in the mouth. The acidity is perfectly matched to the fruit, lively with a touch of piquancy on the ebullient, red cherry and wild strawberry finish that still has a bit of glycerin. The 1995 is the best vintage between 1990 and 2001, and represents a worthy wine to celebrate Thierry Manoncourt's 50th vintage. Tasted June 2015.

  • RP4

    Robert Parker, April 1996,
    Score: 87-90

    Figeac, which always appears to be on a roller-coaster ride in terms of quality, has produced a strong effort in 1995. The healthy dark ruby color is followed by plenty of jammy black fruit aromas intermingled with scents of Asian spices, new wood, and Provencal herbs. Medium-bodied, ripe, and fruity, with undeniable elegance and grace, this soft, round, low acid, flavorful wine is a strong effort from Figeac. It should drink well for 12+ years.All of the wines in this segment were tasted between March 19 and March 28 in Bordeaux. Most of the important wines from both the 1994 and 1995 vintages were tasted three separate times during my ten-day stay in Bordeaux. Drink: 1996-2008.

  • RP3

    Robert Parker, February 1997,
    Score: 90-92

    Figeac has a superlative terroir, but the high percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc planted in the vineyards seems to guarantee frightful inconsistency. When it is great (1982 and 1990), this is one of the most compelling wines made in Bordeaux, offering the texture of a sumptuous Pomerol, yet the aromatic complexity of Cabernet-based Medoc. One of the finest Figeacs produced over the last 15 years, this opaque ruby/purple-colored wine exhibits a penetrating, intense, complex fragrance of balsamic wood, blackcurrants, Asian spice, and smoky, toasty oak. Rich and medium-bodied, with beautifully integrated tannin and acidity, this is Figeac at its best. Let's hope it is not excessively fined and filtered at bottling. Anticipated maturity: 2003-2018.

  • RP2

    Robert Parker, February 1998,
    Score: 89

    The 50th anniversary release of the proprietors, the Manoncourt family, the 1995 Figeac is a gorgeously complex, dark ruby-colored wine that is all delicacy and complexity. The multidimensional, alluring, smoky, toasty, Asian spice, menthol, and cherry-scented nose is followed by soft, round, rich, kirsch-like flavors intermixed with black currants, herbs, and weedy tobacco. While it is less impressive in the mouth, the nose is outstanding. This is a soft, forward style of Figeac that can be drunk young or cellared. Anticipated maturity: Now-2010.

  • RP1

    Robert Parker, January 2003,
    Score: 90

    Elegance, finesse, and a very forward style, particularly for this vintage, make this a delicious wine to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the proprietors, the Manoncourts. The wine is medium-bodied with distinctive weedy, tobacco, and red as well as black currant notes, along with cherry, vanilla, and cedar. The wine is soft, forward, seemingly fully mature, but the cunning thing about Figeac is that it can last for longer than it seems to suggest when young. This is Bordeaux at its most elegant. Anticipated maturity: Now-2012. Last tasted, 12/02.

  • RP

    Robert Parker, February 1998,
    Score: 89

    The 50th anniversary release of the proprietors, the Manoncourt family, the 1995 Figeac is a gorgeously complex, dark ruby-colored wine that is all delicacy and complexity. The multidimensional, alluring, smoky, toasty, Asian spice, menthol, and cherry-scented nose is followed by soft, round, rich, kirsch-like flavors intermixed with black currants, herbs, and weedy tobacco. While it is less impressive in the mouth, the nose is outstanding. This is a soft, forward style of Figeac that can be drunk young or cellared. Anticipated maturity: Now-2010.

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Producer

Château Figeac

Château Figeac has had a chequered history. In the 19th century, its owner went bankrupt and it wasbroken up into various parts - some attaching themselves to Beauregard and La Conseillante.Another part became La Tour Figeac, which was later divided again creating La Tour du Pin Figeac.Luckily, 40 hectares of this once vast estate were able to cling together forming the parameters of one of St Emilion's most recognisable châteaux. Figeac is known to be almost Médoc-like with itssavoury and pensive character.

Region

St Emilion

South of Pomerol lies the medieval, perched village of St Emilion. Surrounding St Emilion are vines that produce round, rich and often hedonistic wines. Despite a myriad of soil types, two main ones dominate - the gravelly, limestone slopes that delve down to the valley from the plateau and the valley itself which is comprised of limestone, gravel, clay and sand. Despite St Emilion's popularity today, it was not until the 1980s to early 1990s that attention was brought to this region. Robert Parker, the famous wine critic, began reviewing their Merlot-dominated wines and giving them hefty scores. The rest is history as they say. Similar to the Médoc, there is a classification system in place which dates from 1955 and outlines several levels of quality. These include its regional appellation of St Emilion, St Emilion Grand Cru, St Emilion Grand Cru Classé and St Emilion Premier Grand Cru Classé, which is further divided into "A" (Ausone and Cheval Blanc) and "B" (including Angélus, Canon, Figeac and a handful of others). To ensure better accuracy, the classification is redone every 10 years enabling certain châteaux to be upgraded or downgraded depending on on the quality of their more recent vintages.